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Monthly Archives: February 2009

Time for a small update again. The last time I wrote I mostly reviewed the work done last year, wrote about the tools used and spent some time comparing Haskell with C++ as I had been busy rewriting the Freekick server in C++. So what’s been going on in the past month? Well, some of the points mentioned in “things to do next” part of the last post have been worked on, while others aren’t. Also, as I have now been using C++ for a few months there have been some signs of the need to wander off to another – hopefully better and shinier – programming language again, just like one would expect. This time I’m not thinking of Haskell though, but Python.

I’ll first let you know what’s new with Freekick core development. There’s been a lot of small improvements – I’ve added some server functionality such as allowing human players to play along or goal detection, but the most important update is that the OGRE client now has the ability to control a player and kick the ball around. This actually makes Freekick a soccer game that can be played. This doesn’t mean, however, that it would actually be fun to play the game – the relatively silly AI makes sure we’re not quite there yet. Another thing that makes the game less fun is that the clubs aren’t really there; the players have no differences in skills or personality, there are no kits or club names or tournaments.

The next thing for me to do is try and eliminate these two problems: first, the AI needs to be made better. At the moment it’s not really that bad – they pass the ball and try to score – but they only have a few actions which makes the match seem repetitive, and the goalkeepers are horrible. Second, the soccer match needs to have a menu around it, including creating and viewing tournaments, lineups, league tables – the whole deal. Actually I’ve already started work on that, which brings me to Python.

You see, working with C++ the whole time with Freekick core was not bad, but after you’ve seen something like Haskell in action, sooner or later you start to wonder if everything really needs to be so complicated. I’m talking about the sheer amount of time spent typing the code in, the loops, the iterators, the classes and headers and declarations, the curly brackets…

As Freekick was designed with modularity in mind and was split to multiple processes from the beginning on, the question of using Python for the game menu arose. After poking around with PyQt for a while the first drafts of the game menu were already finished. I had had my doubts about dynamic languages and duck typing before, but now, after having written a few small applications with Python I’m slowly starting to see the advantages such a dynamic high-level language can bring. I was amazed how fast you could actually write a simple-looking Python script that does the same thing as an application you could spend weeks writing in C++.

Encouraged by my Python adventures, I played around with the idea of solving the other problem – AI – with Python. Since I don’t really fancy writing all the Freekick client side logic in Python, I thought about using Boost.Python to export the C++ classes into Python. Doing the experiment was interesting, but the unfortunate truth is that exporting the classes still seems like too much work, even with the excellent library, especially with the page-long error messages and the fact that the STL containers would apparently also be have to exported manually. The other way would be embedding Python in C++, but I’d still have to export the data structures to Python and back, which makes me think it’s probably faster just to stick with C++ after all.

The GUI part is still far from ready – the only event that starts a match at the moment is a friendly match, and the GUI-match interface is non-existent at the moment – but the base is there and will be expanded when the time is ready. At the moment I think improving the soccer match itself is more important, since there is really no good reason to start a match if playing it isn’t fun, which brings me back to C++ and the AI. I’ve been reading the book “Programming Game AI by Example” by Mat Buckland again, which really is quite an inspiring work, but I think it will still take a while for me before the AI code is in a state where it both seems halfway smart and is easily extensible.

Luckily there are still a couple of mini projects for me to do in case writing AI gets boring. First of all there’s the GUI with all the tournament and schedule creation to do, but I think the time is also slowly getting ready for another Freekick client, this time with ncurses as the “graphics” library. I’ve been wanting to get my hands dirty with ncurses for a while now, and I’m all for minimalistic software, so hey, why not. Other fun things include creating a TV style soccer camera in OGRE and taking player skills into account on the server side. I’ll keep you posted.

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