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About a month ago I announced my then-latest programming project, Star Rover 2. It’s a space flying game written in Haskell, and while programming that was fun and I learnt a lot from the project, it was time to find something else to do. So I started another soccer project, again in Haskell (like in September 2008), but with a bit more Haskell experience under my belt.

And now, after almost a month, it’s time for the first release. The new soccer game is called freekick2, and it’s an open source 2D arcade style soccer game.

If you have cabal, you can install it with a simple cabal update && cabal install freekick2. Here’s a screen  shot from a menu:

The freekick2 distribution includes only a few fantasy teams, but you can use the data files from a Sensible Soccer game for some additional realism.

One lesson I learnt when doing Star Rover 2 is that I should avoid over-engineering like plague, as that was probably one reason why I couldn’t get the first Freekick versions in a releaseable state.

Freekick2 now consists of about 3200 lines of Haskell code, around 1000 more than Star Rover 2, and it’s also a bit fancier, graphics-wise. With Star Rover 2 I used monad transformers to handle the main loop and state changes, which worked pretty well, and I’m using the same technique with freekick2. I still haven’t figured out the whole FRP thing, but game programming in Haskell seems to work out pretty well without.

Things I’ve learnt while programming freekick2:

* Texture mapping with OpenGL in Haskell. To load the textures you need to play around with pointers a bit, which are not really that usual in Haskell. But you can do it, and with the help of some great small libraries like pngload it’s relatively simple in the end. Adding dynamic recoloring of the textures after loading them (to support multiple kit colors) was fun as well.

* Parsing binary data in Haskell. Over a year ago, when I was writing Freekick in C++, I wanted to deserialize the SWOS data files (the format’s known; many thanks to the ones who figured the format out) and I thought parsing binary data sounds like a job for C or C++. The result from back then is about 850 lines long and took a few hours to write. Granted, it also generates some XML. Now I wrote a program to do the same task in Haskell; the result has 250 lines and was written in less than two hours. The Haskell version also includes code for writing SWOS data files – a feature I added just because it was so easy to do. Later, for the freekick-internal data structures, I let BinaryDerive derive the serialization/deserialization code for me. Needless to say, I won’t be doing binary data parsing in C anymore if I get to choose.

* Template Haskell. The state in freekick2 changes pretty often, and is managed in a State monad. I needed a lot of functions of type (FieldType -> FieldType) -> State -> State (like already with Star Rover 2), usually one for each field in a record, and so I let TH generate them all for me. Bulat’s tutorials (links to them can be found here) were a life saver.

* Implementing a GUI with colors, textures and dynamic content, with a tree-like hierarchy for screens.

* Use of the existential quantification language extension for heterogeneous collections. I’ve spent some time with object oriented design in the past, which sometimes leads to object-oriented designs in Haskell, so that something like existential types are needed. In this concrete case, I created the class Sprite, with both the player and the ball implementing it. The easiest way to draw all sprites sorted by depth is then to just put all sprites in one list and sort it. Without existential quantification, I would’ve had to write code to sort the players and then call the draw method of the ball somewhere between the draw methods of the players.

So, programming in Haskell is more fun than ever, and the productivity boost given by Haskell is starting to show more and more.

Here’s the announcement of my latest programming project. It’s called Star Rover 2, and it’s a space flying game. You can fly around in space, trade goods, fight against other ships and complete missions for different governments. It features different difficulty levels, a high score list and several ways for the player to play the game. It’s also the first game I wrote in Haskell that’s actually playable.

Flying between planets

The game itself is quite simple: you start on a planet, and you can buy some cargo if you want before launching into the space. In space, you can fly to other planets and see if you can sell your cargo for a better price. There are other ships in space as well, and you’ll get interrupted every once in a while when coming across one, with the possibility of attacking the other ship. If you win, you get their cargo, and the various governments may have their opinions about the attack as well.

(it looks better in motion :)

Combat in Star Rover 2

As the game progresses, you may earn a reputation among the governing bodies, which leads to new dangers and possibilities. The international relationships are complicated, and attacking a ship of one nationality may not only affect the nationality being attacked but their friends and enemies as well. By playing your cards right you can receive missions from governors, and by completing them you may boost your ranking further.

Captured cargo

The game is quite non-linear; it ends when your ship is destroyed often enough and you are too weak to continue, or when you choose to retire. At the end, your achievements are rated and you may make it to the high score list. Until then, you may choose your activities freely.

You can find Star Rover 2 at Hackage, so if you have cabal, you can install it by running cabal update && cabal install starrover2. You can also fetch the sources from github. As for dependencies, you’ll need SDL, OpenGL and FTGL.

In the beginning, Star Rover 2 was more or less a test of whether I can actually concentrate on one project enough to have a playable game in the end, and I’m glad it’s now reached a state where it can be released. Other than that, I was curious to see what programming such a game actually is like in Haskell, and I’m quite pleased with the results. I started working on Star Rover 2 on my spare time pretty much exactly a month ago, and now it amounts to about 2000 lines of Haskell code. I was a bit worried I couldn’t write a larger project in Haskell, but now I can see how well Haskell scales up to complex tasks. This was also my first project where monad transformers actually came in very handy.

Any feedback and bug reports are of course very welcome.

If you’re planning on writing 3D software in Haskell, here are some tips.

A few months ago I was planning on programming a 3D game in Haskell and was browsing the options for a 3D library. In general, there are a couple of low-level APIs (OpenGL and Direct3D) and a few higher-level libraries built on top of those low-level APIs (OGRE, Irrlicht, and more).  Using a low-level API has the known advantages (fine-grained control) and disadvantages (lots of code to write).

It turned out that limiting the programming language to Haskell is quite restrictive; almost all higher-level libraries are intended for using with C++ (Panda3D being an exception with Python as the intended language; the library itself is written in C++, though). So what you need is Haskell bindings for the libraries. There’s a Haskell binding for OpenGL, which is used for (apparently) all 3D games written in Haskell. A few months ago it was the only option and, if you’re doing anything more complicated than rendering a few models in a scene, it still is.

The problem is that binding a C++ library is rather complicated and basically boils down to either writing C code to wrap the C++ interface and then interfacing the C code in Haskell using FFI or automatically generating the C interface (as well as the Haskell FFI code that wraps it). The latter option was chosen for at least the GUI widget libraries wxHaskell and qtHaskell.

However, a few Haskell bindings for 3D libraries have appeared. There’s a very primitive binding to OGRE written by the author of this post (with examples) as well as at least a start of a binding to Irrlicht by Peter Althainz.  So there appears to be a bit of activity regarding the use of higher-level 3D libraries in Haskell, which is good news, I guess.

One more note regarding the Haskell bindings for Ogre: you can do some simple things like adding models and a camera, and moving them around, but that’s about it, since I haven’t really had the motivation or need to provide support for anything else. The bindings are relatively simple to extend, though, so if you use the bindings and miss a feature, go ahead and let me know.