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Tag Archives: portability

Those of you who’ve been checking out my projects might have noticed that I wrote my latest one in C++. The two previous projects I had written in Haskell. So why the switch? I’ll write down a small summary of the pros and cons of the both languages that influenced my decision.

I’ll start with the things that spoke for Haskell.

  • Haskell, in general, allows a lot more abstract, safer, higher level way of programming. Of course, you already knew this, but it’s still worth mentioning.
  • Hackage has tons of useful packages which makes using libraries and all the associated bureaucracy really simple. (Hackage is basically a repository consisting of almost all open sourced Haskell programs and libraries.) Combine this with cabal, which downloads, compiles and installs the dependencies for you automatically.
  • C++ compile times, especially with Boost, are abysmal.

And now for the cons, or, put in a more positive light, pros for C++.

  • It’s much easier to reason about performance in C++ than in Haskell. This is given, I guess, and the simple solution is to become a Haskell champion who can spot a space leak a mile away, but it bothers me nevertheless. There was a nice post and thread at Haskell cafe a while back about this.
  • Writing portable code in Haskell is not as easy as with C++. With portable I mean 1) code that runs on x86 across operating systems (Windows, Linux and Mac), and 2) code that runs across architectures (x86, ARM, MIPS, etc.). While portability is not as trendy anymore as it once was, I still have the twisted opinion that high quality code in a higher level language absolutely must be portable, otherwise it’s not high quality, and the Haskell ecosystem currently has limited support for writing portable code. Portable across operating systems is relatively simple with Haskell using GHC (although there are exceptions), but portable across architectures is a pain. GHC, the defacto standard Haskell compiler, actively supports only x86 and doesn’t cross compile. Some of the other Haskell compilers do compile across architectures, but they don’t support all the GHC extensions (which are used by a lot of Hackage packages) and often have a huge performance gap with GHC, which leaves me with zero Haskell compilers I’m 100% happy with. Don’t get me wrong, I still appreciate GHC and think it’s magical, but there’s room for improvement.
  • The Haskell libraries are in a constant flux. I’ve been writing Haskell code for a couple of years now, and each time a new GHC version came out, the old code broke. Usually the libraries included with GHC are updated and the interface was changed. Or GHC behaves a bit differently regarding some minor points and the code breaks. Or cabal, which has its main releases together with GHC, has some new features and the code breaks. There are plans for fixing the libraries once and for all (I can’t find the link now), which I think is a great idea, but when they do (and until they do), there’ll be breakage again.
  • Cabal, while great in general, has its problems, namely what cdsmith felicitously dubbed Haskell’s own DLL hell.

As can be seen from the list, the negative issues I see concerning Haskell are mostly not about the language itself but the infrastructure. That makes sense, I guess; Haskell, although it has a great community, is a less used language, especially in the industry, which makes it more difficult to establish an infrastructure that can compete with the one of, say, C++. The problems I have with C++, on the other hand, concern the language itself, which, although useful, is not really what one might consider the crown jewel of language design.

The infrastructure is at least something that can be fixed.